Type  Residential   Completed  2016   Location  Kingston, ON   Architect  Humphryes & Partners   Narrative  The Edge represents a milestone in the development Kingston's Williamsville Neighborhood as one of Canada's largest off-campus student residences.  The timber-frame structure is 21,600 sq-m in total floor area and houses nearly 1000 students. The structure, at the time of construction, was Kingston's largest timber-frame structures.  The structure consists of wood floor and wall systems that bear on a combination of second floor steel framing over the commercial area and a concrete podium that separates the superstructure from the underground parking.   
       
     
  Type  Commercial   Completed  2014   Location  Belleville, ON   Architect  Alexander Wilson Architects Ltd.   Narrative  The newly completed TownePlace Suites is Belleville's only  extended-stay hotel.  The five-storey, 100 suite structure consists of precast concrete slabs on reinforced masonry walls.    
       
     
  Type  Residential   Completed  2016   Location  Wolfe Island, ON   Architect  Hughes Downey Architect   Narrative  Set on the largest of the world-renowned Thousand Islands, this Passive House residence is built with cross-laminated-timber (CLT) on a concrete/geofoam foundation. Review of the pre-fabbed CLT structure, and design of the mass timber exterior roof overhangs and porch, as well as the foundation which was insulated from the earth, made this structure an interesting and unique challenge.   More   https://wolfeislandpassivehouse.wordpress.com/
       
     
  Type  Historical Renovation   Completed  2009   Location  Kingston, ON   Architect  Hughes Downey Architects   Narrative  Located next to City Hall along Kingston's historic waterfront, The Prince George Hotel has been re-imagined to host modern luxury residential loft suites while preserving the historic structure and thriving street-level pubs.  This Second Empire, limestone hotel was originally constructed between 1817 and 1820. The building is recognized by an Ontario Heritage Foundation heritage conservation easement.  The renovation of the structure involved the re-framing of much of the building to accomodate new floor layouts, and repairing deficient and fire-damaged portions of the building.